Snapshots

Skyways connect 78% of Minneapolis’ downtown office inventory

Minnesota’s notorious winters have always inspired innovative commercial real estate solutions.

March 05, 2019
  • Minnesota’s notorious winters have always inspired innovative commercial real estate solutions. America’s first indoor mall Southdale opened in Edina in 1956 to much fanfare. It was developed by the Dayton Company, predecessor to Target Corporation. As a reaction to Southdale’s suburban climate-controlled retail experience, developers began constructing second-story covered walkways between downtown Minneapolis buildings in the early 1960s. The 1972 construction of the IDS Center, with skyways extending in all four directions, was the biggest catalyst for what is now the world’s largest skyway system connecting 80 blocks with over 8 miles of walkways.
  • Today, 78% of all office space in the Minneapolis CBD is skyway-connected. In the CBD Core (which excludes the older Warehouse District and North Loop), 94% of office is skyway-connected. The skyway links offices to parking, retail, multifamily, hotels, theaters, a university, and three professional sports stadiums. The skyways are an amenity for all downtown employees by offering space for exercise and walking as well as access to 140 different dining options for coffee, lunch, and happy hours. When temperatures drop to -20°F or when over 3 feet of snow falls in one month, Minneapolitans can enjoy navigating one of the densest employment centers in the Midwest without a coat!

Source: JLL Research, Meet Minneapolis, MinnPost; analysis includes buildings >30,000 s.f.

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